The Midwife – Book Review

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TheMidwife

Since the day Rhoda Mummau was baptized into the Old Order Mennonite Church and became the head midwife of Hopen Haus, she’s been torn between the needs of the unwed mothers under her care and her desire to conceal the secrets of her past. Contact with the outside world could provide medical advantages, but remaining secluded in the community gives her the anonymity she craves.

Graduate student Beth Winslow is on a path she never would have chosen. Heartbroken after surrendering a baby to adoption, she devotes herself to her studies until she becomes pregnant again, this time as a surrogate. But when early tests indicate possible abnormalities, Beth is unprepared for the parents’ decision to end the pregnancy—and for the fierce love she feels for this unborn child. Desperate, she flees the city and seeks refuge at Hopen House.

Past and present collide when a young woman named Amelia arrives to the sweeping countryside bearing secrets of her own. As Amelia’s due date draws near, Rhoda must face her past and those she thought she had left behind in order for the healing power of love and forgiveness to set them all free.

I can count the number of Amish and Mennonite books that I have read on one hand. (Actually, I think the grand total before this book was two.) I’m just normally not a fan of the genre, so when I first saw the cover for The Midwife, I quickly glossed over it. But later, reading through descriptions of new releases, I was drawn to the story.

I have always found the concept of surrogate mothers to be interesting. What would it be like to shelter a baby in your womb, knowing that it wasn’t – and never would be – yours? The difficult situation that Beth finds herself in immediately drew me in, making me care about her character as I watched her struggle. At the same time, the pain and longing of Rhoda and Amelia’s situation encourage sympathy for their characters.

This was a beautifully written book with characters who were both well-developed and realistic. Choosing to write in the first person has allowed Jolina Petersheim a direct outlet between the emotions of the characters and her readers, and choosing not to wrap difficult subjects up in pretty bows lends realism to this story.

If I had judged this novel by its cover, I never would have read it. Now I’m glad that I didn’t let it stop me from discovering this journey. If you like Amish and Mennonite fiction or stories that make you think, I would recommend that you give The Midwife a chance.

This post contains affiliate links. I receive a small commission from all purchases made through these links, which allows me to buy more books and keep blogging!

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