Claiming Mariah – Book Review

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ClaimingMariah

After her father’s death, Mariah Malone sends a letter that will forever alter the lives of her family. When Slade Donovan, strong willed and eager for vengeance, shows up on her front porch, Mariah is not ready to hear his truths: her father’s farm, the only home she’s ever known, was bought with stolen gold. With Slade ready to collect his father’s rightful claim and force Mariah and her family out on the streets, Mariah must turn to God for guidance. Though Mr. Frederick Cooper, a local landowner, promises to answer her financial woes if she agrees to be his bride, Mariah finds herself drawn instead to the angry young man demanding her home.

With the ranch now under Slade’s careful eye, he unearths more than he ever imagined as a devious plot of thievery, betrayal, and murder threatens the well-being of the ranch, endangering those who hold it dear. As the days dwindle until the rest of the Donovan clan arrives at the Lazy M ranch, Mariah and Slade must rise above the resentment of their fathers and see their true feelings before greed changes their futures forever.

Honestly, I expected a bit more from this story. The books that I have read lately from Tyndale House have been so unique that I was looking forward to experiencing more of that creativity in Claiming Mariah.  However, rather than breaking new ground, this book fit comfortably into the western romance structure. Reading the synopsis basically allows you to figure out the entire plot of the book, and the subplots arrive exactly on time.

Despite the predictability of the story, I thought that this novel was very well written, and there were several things about it that I liked. The attraction between Mariah and Slade is vivid and immediate. Although I’m not really a fan of love at first sight stories, this instant attraction probably helped to keep the plot interesting – especially as neither of them trust the other. Their constant inner monologue also keeps you aware of this attraction. All of these are useful tools in progressing the story and relationship of the characters, but one of my favorite elements of this story was the use of the POV of one of the villains. Seeing the story from his perspective helped to add a hint of danger to a story that tended strongly toward the syrupy sweet.

While this was not my favorite read of the year, it was a fun western romance. If you’re looking for something light to pass the time, this might be your ticket!

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