All For a Sister – Book Review

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AllForASister

In Hollywood during the Roaring Twenties, Celeste DuFrane has it all. Her father’s work with color movie film opens doors that lead to the stardom she’s always aspired to. But after losing her mother, she discovers that half the estate has been left to a woman accused of killing Celeste’s baby sister before Celeste was even born.

Dana Lundgren arrives on the steps of the DuFrane mansion having spent most of her life imprisoned for a crime that never happened. After accusing her of murder so many years ago, why did Marguerite DuFrane leave her a sizeable inheritance?

As Celeste and Dana learn each other’s stories, they come up with more questions than answers. Then a surprising discovery begins to fill in the missing pieces: Marguerite DuFrane’s written confession, penned shortly before her death. Uncovering the treachery and deceit that changed the course of countless lives—most of all, their own—the two women find more than they ever dreamed of.

All for a Sister is the second book by Allison Pittman that I have read. Both books have confirmed that she is an author with a unique voice and storytelling techniques that are far different from most other Christian authors.

Other than the unique premise, which grabbed me instantly, the thing that really stood out to me about this novel was the way that it was told. The books spans twenty years but is not told in chronological order. Rather, the story is told in fragments from three different perspectives: Celeste’s perspective, Dana’s perspective, and Marguerite’s written confession. This allows the author to feed the reader pieces of information and tease clues that will not be revealed until another character’s perspective reveals it. Sometimes I find this fragmented style to be distracting, but for this book it helped to hold my attention and added to the mystery.

Ms. Pittman is not afraid to deal with dark subjects or to give her characters genuine hardships – even to the point of sending a character to prison and leaving her accuser to deal with her guilt. And because she is such a talented writer, she is able to breathe life into the characters, making you care about them even as you watch them suffer. Her descriptions of their physical appearances also subtly re-enforces the character traits and struggles that define them.

Hollywood in the 1920’s is a fascinating setting, and I enjoyed reading a book that was set in this period. It definitely added interest to have a book with a setting not often portrayed in Christian fiction. Having studied American film, I also found it interesting to see how she included several celebrities of the time.

I enjoyed this book, mostly because of the way that the plot was told. If you love unique Christian fiction, this might be the book for you!

This post contains affiliate links. I receive a small commission from all purchases made through these links, which allows me to buy more books and keep blogging!

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